Analysis of the poem by countee cullen yet do i marvel

The poet seems to be in a state of wonderment and surprise that God would allow people to suffer but he doesn't seem enraged. The poet finally reveals himself as not only a poet, but a Black poet.

countee cullen heritage

For most of the rest of the poem tosses out infinite mysteries from Tantalus being tortured by fruit always ever just out of reach to Sisyphus never being quite able to get that rock up and over the edge.

On the other hand, the blackness of the poet is a source of pride, a gift of that Almighty Creator whose ways are always right. He wrote articles, became an editor and had a novel published inOne Way to Heaven, which had a lukewarm reception in the literary world.

yet do i marvel classical references

Like his black skin, Cullen's poetic talent is a mysterious source of both pain and joy. It speaks not just of the Black condition but of the human condition. The "I" at the beginning of the poem is an anonymous human.

Countee cullen biography

All humans experience the worldy imperfections like suffering and death. Yet Do I Marvel I doubt not God is good, well-meaning, kind, And did He stoop to quibble could tell why The little buried mole continues blind, Why flesh that mirrors Him must some day die, Make plain the reason tortured Tantalus Is baited by the fickle fruit, declare If merely brute caprice dooms Sisyphus To struggle up a never-ending stair. Of all the incomprehensible actions of God, the most amazing for the poet to understand is that God made him both a poet and Black. Mysterious, indeed, are the ways of God though He be kind, good and well-meaning. The physical sensation of stop and start at each line break contributes to this feeling of confusion because it gives the reader a sense of incompletion. It is split into an octave eight lines and a quatrain four lines before the couplet concludes. This poem explores themes of racism but it doesn't necessarily cover any of the Harlem Renaissance themes e. Blackness is a focal point of the poem. Indeed, Cullen emphasizes the involuntary nature of his poetry. It is not until the last two lines of the poem that we find out the poet is Black.

It is the last of a series of imponderables in the human condition. Thus Cullen, a poet of the Harlem Renaissance in the early part of the twentieth century, was asserting the mysterious beauty of black skin long before the Civil Rights movement made Black pride fashionable later in the century.

color by countee cullen

Detroit: Gale Research, He became better known for his traditional lyric poetry. The poem is a first-person monologue in which a Black poet, indistinguishable from Cullen, voices doubt and confusion about the world, about the relationship between God and man, and about this particular poet's place in the world.

Countee cullen collected poems

Although made in God's image, the human body must die. It is not clear if the narrator is Cullen himself or not. Thus Cullen, a poet of the Harlem Renaissance in the early part of the twentieth century, was asserting the mysterious beauty of black skin long before the Civil Rights movement made Black pride fashionable later in the century. In this metaphor human flesh is compared to a looking glass which reflects the image of God. It continues a feeling of confusion and frustration. Cullen uses a metaphor when he writes, "When flesh that mirrors Him must some day die. The poet didn't choose to be a poet any more than he chose to be Black. He became better known for his traditional lyric poetry. Cullen employs metonymy when he uses "flesh" to refer to human beings. The poet talks about racism and his struggle with being a black poet but he doesn't seem resentful. Although their human flesh is god-like, Tantalus and Sisyphus experience incomprehensible suffering and their condition reflects the ironic condition of every mortal, poised between God and death. It is the last of a series of imponderables in the human condition. The poet begins by professing his belief in a God who is all-good, good-intentioned and almighty. Yet do I marvel at this curious thing: To make a poet black, and bid him sing! On the other hand, the blackness of the poet is a source of pride, a gift of that Almighty Creator whose ways are always right.

The speaker expresses from the opening line his faith in the goodness of God, and then attempts to put into context just why it is that God's actions are beyond the understanding of mere mortals.

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Revisiting the Harlem Renaissance: "Yet Do I Marvel" A Poetry Analysis Of Countee Cullen