Rhetorical analysis of where i lived

Where i lived and what i lived for pdf

He urges people to live their lives deliberately by sharing stories of his personal experiences. A noteworthy view of Thoreau, and one that is most typical of transcendentalist doctrine, is his rejection of reason and logic in favor of emotion. Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep. He also makes it a point to insure the readers that he did not spend his time at Walden as a hermit. In order to do this he told of how his time at Walden was spent building and maintaining his house, raising thousands of bean plants and other vegetables, making bread, clearing land, chopping wood, making repairs for the Emersons, going into town, and writing every day. He describes its placement in the cosmos, in a region viewed by the astronomers, just as God created a world within the void of space. Did you ever think what those sleepers are that underlie the railroad? Thoreau emphasizes the work of reading, just as he stresses the work of farming and home-owning; he compares the great reader to an athlete who has subjected himself to long training and regular exercise. According to him, everyone should mind their own business and let things that are supposed to happen, or that will happen no matter what if nothing is done to change it, happen.

Thoreau justifies his solitude by showing how he is in a sense not alone, but surrounded by nature and the many wild animals that are his neighbors at Walden. Clearly Thoreau does not mean everyone else is sleeping, but that only a few people seem to be aware of what Thoreau argues.

He implies that those who benefit from technology are doing so at the expense of the workers, who are ridden upon. Thoreau has a highly romanticized view of morning, which he holds to be the most important and productive time of day.

Thoreau gradually extends his criticism of cheap reading to a criticism of the dominant culture of Concord, which deprives even the local gifted minds access to great thought.

Rhetorical analysis of where i lived

All of these points that Walden makes are an attempt to give mankind the courage it takes to live the way he lives, and by doing so discover happiness and self-fulfillment. Consequently, Thoreau gave up his claim on the property. Emersonian self-reliance is not just a matter of supporting oneself financially as many people believe but a much loftier doctrine about the active role that every soul plays in its experience of reality. Thoreau gradually extends his criticism of cheap reading to a criticism of the dominant culture of Concord, which deprives even the local gifted minds access to great thought. Each one is a man, an Irishman, or a Yankee man. It moves people from one point to another faster, but Thoreau has little use for travel anyway. The only current events that matter to the transcendent mind are itself and its place in the cosmos. To be awake is to be alive. Thoreau takes time to really point out how easy it would be for those that wanted to follow in his footsteps, in hopes that some actually would. Summary One of the many delightful pursuits in which Thoreau is able to indulge, having renounced a big job and a big mortgage, is reading. Thoreau starts Walden with a reoccurring theme of simplicity. Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep. According to him, everyone should mind their own business and let things that are supposed to happen, or that will happen no matter what if nothing is done to change it, happen.

We would not worry about what life would bring us next, for we would not ever think about changing it and making it more complex, full of falseness and deception. Thoreau amused himself by watching wildlife during the winter.

In conclusion, Thoreau mainly uses alliteration and metaphors to display his attitude toward life. Thoreau uses the metaphor of sleepers under the track to give a visual demonstration of the dangers of technology.

where i lived and what i lived for analysis

Moral reform is the effort to throw off sleep. You are on page 1of 4 Search inside document Andy Campbell Mrs. Thoreau thus reminds us again that he is neither practical do-it-yourself aficionado nor erudite philosopher, but a mixture of both at once, attending to matters of everyday existence and to questions of final meaning and purpose.

Parallel structure in where i lived and what i lived for

Thoreau is skeptical, as well, of the change in mindset the railroads have brought about. Towards the end of Walden Thoreau once again criticizes conformity, arguing that the masses of men are keeping individuals from living a simple, deliberate, and solitary life; simply because it is deemed socially unacceptable. Reality for Emerson was not a set of objective facts in which we are plunked down, but rather an emanation of our minds and souls that create the world around ourselves every day. Related posts:. Thoreau also employs logos by demonstrating his vast understanding of economy in recording all of his earnings and expenditures, just to make certain that the reader knows that this simple lifestyle hindered him in no way whatsoever. The rails are laid on them, and they are covered with sand, and the cars run smoothly over them. The millions are awake enough for physical labor; but only one in a million is awake enough for effective intellectual exertion, only one in a hundred millions to a poetic or divine life. He sees it as a false example of social progress, claiming that We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us. He uses vivid analogies, anecdotes, and imagery to form a picture of what his life looks like from his point of view, in the minds of his readers. In order to do this he told of how his time at Walden was spent building and maintaining his house, raising thousands of bean plants and other vegetables, making bread, clearing land, chopping wood, making repairs for the Emersons, going into town, and writing every day. When Thoreau first moves into his dwelling on Independence Day, it gives him a proud sense of being a god on Olympus, even though the house still lacks a chimney and plastering. Thoreau emphasizes the work of reading, just as he stresses the work of farming and home-owning; he compares the great reader to an athlete who has subjected himself to long training and regular exercise. Despite the much-lauded progress of modern society in technology and transportation, he says real progress—that of the mind and soul—is being forgotten.

All of these points that Walden makes are an attempt to give mankind the courage it takes to live the way he lives, and by doing so discover happiness and self-fulfillment.

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SparkNotes: Walden: Where I Lived, and What I Lived For